The Southerner

All Nations students build community with lacrosse sticks

All+Nations+students+have+the+opportunity+to+learn+the+process+of+building+traditional+lacrosse+sticks.+Every+spring+All+Nations+students+learn+traditional+lacrosse+as+part+of+the+curriculum.+The+introduction+of+the+game+is+an+important+connection+to+their+traditional+culture+and+building+sticks+takes+that+a+step+further.+South+sophomore%2C+Ava+Keezer-Dow+said%2C+%E2%80%9CBefore+lacrosse+was+just+always+a+game+%5Bbut%5D+since+I+started+making+%5Blacrosse+sticks%5D+it%E2%80%99s+just+like+I+felt+more+connected+to+something+bigger.%E2%80%9D
Back to Article
Back to Article

All Nations students build community with lacrosse sticks

All Nations students have the opportunity to learn the process of building traditional lacrosse sticks. Every spring All Nations students learn traditional lacrosse as part of the curriculum. The introduction of the game is an important connection to their traditional culture and building sticks takes that a step further. South sophomore, Ava Keezer-Dow said, “Before lacrosse was just always a game [but] since I started making [lacrosse sticks] it’s just like I felt more connected to something bigger.”

All Nations students have the opportunity to learn the process of building traditional lacrosse sticks. Every spring All Nations students learn traditional lacrosse as part of the curriculum. The introduction of the game is an important connection to their traditional culture and building sticks takes that a step further. South sophomore, Ava Keezer-Dow said, “Before lacrosse was just always a game [but] since I started making [lacrosse sticks] it’s just like I felt more connected to something bigger.”

David 'Bezh' Butler

All Nations students have the opportunity to learn the process of building traditional lacrosse sticks. Every spring All Nations students learn traditional lacrosse as part of the curriculum. The introduction of the game is an important connection to their traditional culture and building sticks takes that a step further. South sophomore, Ava Keezer-Dow said, “Before lacrosse was just always a game [but] since I started making [lacrosse sticks] it’s just like I felt more connected to something bigger.”

David 'Bezh' Butler

David 'Bezh' Butler

All Nations students have the opportunity to learn the process of building traditional lacrosse sticks. Every spring All Nations students learn traditional lacrosse as part of the curriculum. The introduction of the game is an important connection to their traditional culture and building sticks takes that a step further. South sophomore, Ava Keezer-Dow said, “Before lacrosse was just always a game [but] since I started making [lacrosse sticks] it’s just like I felt more connected to something bigger.”

Talula Cedar-James and Ida Pountney

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Students have the opportunity to learn how to hand-build traditional lacrosse sticks during and after school. Traditional Lacrosse is an important part of South’s All Nations program. Teachers introduce the game to the freshmen in the spring yearly and continue to develop skills in the game over the year.

According to Vince Patton, a South social studies teacher; All Nations students are required to learn the process of building lacrosse sticks during their time at South at least once. “We also have an after school [option] if the students actually want to continue doing this,” said Patton.

The students who come into work after school are part of a more focused project to learn the woodworking techniques and make sticks to sell to people and organizations in the community. Patton said, “we’ve made orders for Center School, Anishinabe Academy [and] we’ve made orders for other schools around the metro.”

The project has made an impact on students and is allowing a chance to connect with their native culture and gain woodworking experience. South Sophomore Ava Keezer-Dow said, “before lacrosse was just always a game [but] since I started making [lacrosse sticks] it’s just like I felt more connected to something bigger.”

Initially, the program was going to be funded through a $70,000 grant from the Minnesota State Arts Board but due to a mistake in the grant application process, it didn’t go through. Kerry York, MPS grant manager said it was because, “there were some pieces of the grant application and what was going to be done with the funds, which we can’t do with grant dollars according to our own district policies.”

Currently, the All Nations program does have funds from a yearly grant that, once finalized, will cover the costs of projects like building lacrosse sticks. This allows for students involved to earn a stipend for their work but the amount will most likely be significantly smaller than originally planned. As All Nations Coordinator David (Bezh) Butler put it, “We can pay some [students] but it won’t be $70,000 of paying them.”

One goal of the project is to connect students to their culture by learning traditional building techniques. “It’s all about revitalizing our cultural ways. One of those ways is making these lacrosse sticks,” said Patton. The techniques learned through making the lacrosse sticks will build skills needed for later traditional woodworking projects the All Nations teachers hope to facilitate.

The project is part of a larger goal of not only teaching traditional skills but also getting students involved and supporting them in all areas. Butler said, “I want to make sure were providing holistic care so even if it’s providing job opportunities… or healthcare or mental health [support], we try to do everything we can for these kids.” The plan to provide stipends for students work is one part of this support.

 

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
About the Writers
Talula Cedar-James, Staff Writer

Talula Cedar-James is a sophomore who likes crime shows and arts like drawing, painting, and photography. This is her first year working on the Southerner...

Ida Pountney, Staff Writer

Freshman Ida Pountney is starting her first year on the Southerner staff. Recommended to her by someone at orientation, Pountney hopes that being on the...

Leave a Comment

We appreciate all of our readers who would like to interact with the articles we post. We ask that you keep comments relevant, respectful, constructive, and helpful to our staff. We also ask that you refrain from using profanity in your comment. We reserve the right to reject comments that don’t follow our community and comment guidelines. If you notice an error in an article, you may leave a comment with an email address attached. Thanks so much for stopping by and checking out our content!

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




Polls

If you were able to vote (regardless of age) out of the following declared or likely to declare candidates, which would you choose to be the 46th President of the United States?

  • Former Vice President Joe Biden (43%, 72 Votes)
  • California Senator Kamala Harris (20%, 33 Votes)
  • Current President Donald Trump (17%, 29 Votes)
  • Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders (7%, 11 Votes)
  • South Bend Indiana Mayor Pete Buttigieg (7%, 11 Votes)
  • Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren (4%, 6 Votes)
  • Entrepreneur Andrew Yang (2%, 3 Votes)
  • Hawaii Representative Tulsi Gabbard (2%, 3 Votes)
  • Minnesota Senator Amy Klobuchar (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Former Federal Housing Secretary and San Antonio Mayor Julian Castro (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Washington Governor Jay Inslee (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Former Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Maryland Representative John Delaney (0%, 0 Votes)
  • New York Senator Kirsten Gillibrand (0%, 0 Votes)
  • New Jersey Senator Cory Booker (0%, 0 Votes)
  • None of the above (0%, 0 Votes)

Total Voters: 13,849

Loading ... Loading ...
Navigate Left
  • All Nations students build community with lacrosse sticks

    Award winning stories

    For the Avres, wrestling is a family affair

  • All Nations students build community with lacrosse sticks

    Sports

    Andrew Njogu dribbles his way to the national futsal team

  • All Nations students build community with lacrosse sticks

    Baseball

    Luke Pettersen, a fresh face to South baseball

  • All Nations students build community with lacrosse sticks

    Club Sports

    Climbing Club gains a hold at South

  • All Nations students build community with lacrosse sticks

    Hockey

    What the puck?! hockey fees raised since fall of 2018

  • All Nations students build community with lacrosse sticks

    Sports

    In rivalry game, Women’s Basketball shines in second half

  • All Nations students build community with lacrosse sticks

    Hockey

    The difference between Men’s and Women’s Hockey is chilling

  • All Nations students build community with lacrosse sticks

    Sports

    Teacher support of student athletes is vital to success in both academics and sport

  • All Nations students build community with lacrosse sticks

    Sports

    Nick Carter hopes to pedal to the Olympics

  • All Nations students build community with lacrosse sticks

    Sports

    Swim team dives into new home at Phillips pool

Navigate Right
The South High School student news site
All Nations students build community with lacrosse sticks