The Southerner

Talent Show proved an overall success with original, creative acts

Elise Sommers, Staff writer

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An adoring audience, singing along to your songs is a dream that may only be reached by the lucky few aspiring musicians who achieve success in the music business.  For the participants in the 2011 South High talent show last Wednesday, however, this dream was an invigorating reality.
First place champion, Jahkobi Martin-Senna, a freshman, stated that his favorite part was “the end of it, like, right after I finished, and everybody started cheering.”
Martin-Senna performed a beat boxing routine – spontaneously.
“All I did was, like at home, I recorded a whole bunch of different videos, and played it back on my phone right before it [the show], so I would have ideas to go on,” Martin-Senna stated.  He claimed that it was common in the beat boxing world not to have a routine, but rather to improvise.  In hindsight, though, he recommends planning it out.
“I would say to make a routine, ‘cause it was kind of hard to think of stuff to do.”
Apart from the annual staples of singers and guitarists, acts such as a Chinese harp, a Cheetah Girls impersonation, and teacher Joe Henry on his banjo were unique to the South High stage.
“We originally decided not to allow spoken word because it turns out to be so controversial.  But the people that came out were so good,” stated teacher Arthur French, who acts as a supervisor with Tanya Hodge of the National Honors Society at South. NHS is the organization that sponsors the talent show event.
Another unusual act was a collaboration between a school team, and a separate act.  Student dancer, senior Alec Trelstead worked with the South High dance team to create a cohesive performance.
“It wasn’t just some number the dance team had been practicing, it was a choreographed measure between the dance team and an outsider [Trelstead],” French complimented the act.
Despite the audience that French estimated to be at least 450 people, the NHS advisor also acknowledged the competition between events, that can lead to decreased popularity of events.
“It’s always really difficult to promote school events you have to sell tickets for,” French stated.  Ticket-selling times for the talent show, as with many other events, were limited to lunches.  “Tickets and advertising are probably the toughest thing.”
All in all though, the talent show was considered a success.
“It came off excellent,” French raved.  “I had parents and teachers who just dropped in to see their student or kids perform, and said they couldn’t leave.”    An adoring audience, singing along to your songs is a dream that may only be reached by the lucky few aspiring musicians who achieve success in the music business.  For the participants in the 2011 South High talent show, however, this dream was an invigorating reality.
First place champion, Jahkobi Martin-Senna, a freshman, stated that his favorite part was “the end of it, like, right after I finished, and everybody started cheering.”
Martin-Senna performed a beat boxing routine – spontaneously.
“All I did was, like at home, I recorded a whole bunch of different videos, and played it back on my phone right before it [the show], so I would have ideas to go on,” Martin-Senna stated.  He claimed that it was common in the beat boxing world not to have a routine, but rather to improvise.  In hindsight, though, he recommends planning it out.
“I would say to make a routine, ‘cause it was kind of hard to think of stuff to do.”
Apart from the annual staples of singers and guitarists, acts such as a Chinese harp, a Cheetah Girls impersonation, and teacher Joe Henry on his banjo were unique to the South High stage.
“We originally decided not to allow spoken word because it turns out to be so controversial.  But the people that came out were so good,” stated teacher Arthur French, who acts as a supervisor with Tanya Hodge of the National Honors Society at South. NHS is the organization that sponsors the talent show event.
Another unusual act was a collaboration between a school team, and a separate act.  Student dancer, senior Alec Trelstead worked with the South High dance team to create a cohesive performance.
“It wasn’t just some number the dance team had been practicing, it was a choreographed measure between the dance team and an outsider [Alec],” French complimented the act.
Despite the audience that French estimated to be at least 450 people, the NHS advisor also acknowledged the competition between events, that can lead to decreased popularity of events.
“It’s always really difficult to promote school events you have to sell tickets for,” French stated.  Ticket-selling times for the talent show, as with many other events, were limited to lunches.  “Tickets and advertising are probably the toughest thing.”
All in all though, the talent show was considered a success.
“It came off excellent,” French raved.  “I had parents and teachers who just dropped in to see their student or kids perform, and said they couldn’t leave.”    An adoring audience, singing along to your songs is a dream that may only be reached by the lucky few aspiring musicians who achieve success in the music business.  For the participants in the 2011 South High talent show, however, this dream was an invigorating reality.
First place champion, Jahkobi Martin-Senna, a freshman, stated that his favorite part was “the end of it, like, right after I finished, and everybody started cheering.”
Martin-Senna performed a beat boxing routine – spontaneously.
“All I did was, like at home, I recorded a whole bunch of different videos, and played it back on my phone right before it [the show], so I would have ideas to go on,” Martin-Senna stated.  He claimed that it was common in the beat boxing world not to have a routine, but rather to improvise.  In hindsight, though, he recommends planning it out.
“I would say to make a routine, ‘cause it was kind of hard to think of stuff to do.”
Apart from the annual staples of singers and guitarists, acts such as a Chinese harp, a Cheetah Girls impersonation, and teacher Joe Henry on his banjo were unique to the South High stage.
“We originally decided not to allow spoken word because it turns out to be so controversial.  But the people that came out were so good,” stated teacher Arthur French, who acts as a supervisor with Tanya Hodge of the National Honors Society at South. NHS is the organization that sponsors the talent show event.
Another unusual act was a collaboration between a school team, and a separate act.  Student dancer, senior Alec Trelstead worked with the South High dance team to create a cohesive performance.
“It wasn’t just some number the dance team had been practicing, it was a choreographed measure between the dance team and an outsider [Alec],” French complimented the act.
Despite the audience that French estimated to be at least 450 people, the NHS advisor also acknowledged the competition between events, that can lead to decreased popularity of events.
“It’s always really difficult to promote school events you have to sell tickets for,” French stated.  Ticket-selling times for the talent show, as with many other events, were limited to lunches.  “Tickets and advertising are probably the toughest thing.”
All in all though, the talent show was considered a success.
“It came off excellent,” French raved.  “I had parents and teachers who just dropped in to see their student or kids perform, and said they couldn’t leave.”

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About the Writer
Elise Sommers, Editor-in-Chief

My name is Elise Sommers, and I am the Editor-in-Chief at the Southerner. I am a senior at South. The teamwork of all of us contributing and working to...

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Talent Show proved an overall success with original, creative acts