Day of thanks brings day of materialistic chaos

Maggie Horstman, Staff Writer

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Thanksgiving is a national holiday celebrated by Americans since the 1800s. It’s a time of happiness, unity, and of course, delicious food. It’s a day where people give thanks for all of the important people/things in their lives. Although this day is all about giving thanks, ironically the day that follows concerns shopping, spending, and wanting more.

Black Friday gets its name from the financial term “in the red”, which represents a company losing profit, while being “in the black”, is gaining money. Considering all of the shoppers on Black Fridays in the past, this term seems to fit the occasion.

Black Friday is one of the biggest (and most competitive) shopping days of the year. According to CNN, in November 2008  “a temporary Walmart employee was trampled to death in a rush of thousands of early morning shoppers.” Police officers at the scene said some customers received minor injuries as well.

That day Walmart opened at five in the morning, but this year some stores are open as early as three.Though there are major early morning sales and deals, is the chaos worth it?

Millions of customers still shop on Black Friday every year, including South High Students.“[On Black Friday] I’m going to Mall of America because there are great sales and cheap stuff” said sophomore Rachel Jacobson. “I’m going to buy myself an iPod.”

Sophomore Taylor Grham agrees, “Black Friday is great because you’re full and rested from Thanksgiving, and then you work it all off shopping. Plus it’s fun!”

Though shoppers may think it’s fun, the experience is a little different for mall employees. Junior Shade Croft, who works at Paciugo Gelato at the Mall of America isn’t too bothered by the rush of customers on Black Friday,“I think I’ll get a lot of tips, so I don’t mind it.” Although Croft is excited about extra tips, he isn’t thrilled about how busy he’ll be.

In 2004, companies participating in Black Friday made a total of 414.6 billion dollars. By 2009 the profit had grown by over 55 billion dollars.

Although many people participate and spend quite a bit of money on Black Friday, others are against the idea. “Black Friday is too crowded unless you want to wake up at three in the morning,” said sophomore Christina Houston, “I would rather wait until later than go to the mall on such a hectic day.”

Black Friday attracts millions of Americans each year. Some enjoy it for the mere experience, some race to be the first to walk down the aisles of their favorite store and some are lucky enough to be selected to work on the annual day of chaos. At least all that turkey eating gives you enough energy to bear it all.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email